Stanley's blog

President Bush “made explicit the goal of maintaining U.S. military superiority over any other nation or group of potential adversaries.”

The pursuit of permanent military supremacy has been an ongoing objective of the current White House. Coupled with the country’s economic strength, the generally accepted view was that American hegemony was assured for the foreseeable future.

In 2008, Russian troops occupied undisputed Georgian territory, destroyed the Georgian army and its hardware, sunk ships and brought the country to its knees.

And what has been the US reactions? Messages of support for Georgia and condemnation of Russian action. President Bush signalled that the break-up of Georgia or the loss of its sovereignty was unacceptable to the US. Washington would seek to preserve “a sovereign, free Georgia and its territorial integrity”.

Russia has now recognised the independence of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.

The Asian scene is a litany of failures. Iraq is an ongoing débacle; there is no end in sight in Afghanistan; the Pakistani illusion is drawing to a close; there is a clear impression that the West is being teased in Iran with little to show in return; scant progress is being made in North Korea, none in Myanmar nor Sudan.

How did this happen? Because the US forfeited its moral leadership and respect, thanks to the neocon’s vision of the world, beginning with the disastrous invasion of Iraq and continuing with the pursuit of unrealistic goals (eg democracy in the Middle East) by the wrong means (imposition from the outside).

“Any failure traceable to arrogance or our lack of comprehension…would inflict upon us a grievous hurt, both at home and abroad”, said President Eisenhower in his farewell address (see post of 23 August). Another history lesson ignored!

We are witnessing the result of the bankruptcy of the GW Bush foreign policy era. Needless to say, European leaders sat on their hands most of the time, and have still failed to step into this leadership vacuum, a development which would be welcome in several parts of the world. We are all quick to criticise American leadership, but, on many occasions, nothing would have happened without it.

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Comments

  1. I fully agree with your last sentence: “We are all quick to criticise American leadership, but, on many occasions, nothing would have happened without it.” At times it seems that the US has not greater enemies than those who are supposed to be its allies in Europe.

  2. I wonder if we are right to place the responsibility for sorting out the world’s problems on the United States? Doesn’t at least some of the responsibility lie with the United Nations?

  3. Stanley, in view of your feeling that the vetoes on the Security Council paralyse it, what do you think of this organisation? It is useful or not? And, if it is useful, in what way, for whom and how?

  4. The UN GA is a talking shop – but we need one
    Remember also that the real discussions take place outside the GA
    UN SC is not always paralysed by veto and it serves a useful purpose even if it could be more useful
    None of five will give up veto
    but new permanent members (without veto) should be appointed
    One day, UK/F should give up,their seat to EU

  5. I personally, really glad, that Russia did not listen to the USA and did what she did. It seems that Russia is gaining its forth, and it is for the best.

  6. European braiwashed lemmings are ready to be enslaved and the United Nations is anxious to help them achieve their objective to increase its power.

    Fortunately, there are intelligent and courageous leaders like Vaclav Klaus, president of the Czech Republic, who just assumed the presidency of the European Union. His opinions are a breath of fresh air from the old, socialist Europe, particularly when he states that “environmentalism is the new communism and climate change is a dangerous myth.” The world needs more leaders like Vaclav Klaus.

  7. Antonia Sosa, what good Mr Klaus has given to humanity or the EU besides being funny or sometimes surprisingly annoying? He has a very little power to obstruct things, but he has not constructed anything in Europe. Nor in the Czech Republic during his presidency.

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