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Archives for China

Most of the media reporting of the meeting of the European Council in Brussels was, understandably, on the financial crisis. The following is a summary of all decisions, which is worth browsing, as it gives a flavour of the priorities and extent of current activities:(para numbers do not necessarily correspond to conclusions) Summary 1. Finance… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

China yesterday decided to cut its interest rate by 0.5% – in line with the cuts by six leading central banks. This is the second cut in less than one month, confirming the government’s support of economic growth, even at the risk of further inflation. While the decision makes good sense, it carries a political… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

Yesterday’s decision, announced simultaneously by six important central banks (including the ECB, US Fed and Bank of England), to lower their interest rates by 0.5%, was a welcome and indeed historic exercise in international cooperation. Long may the cooperation last! Despite a number of bold steps by national governments to increase liquidity in the banking… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

The potential ramifications of the Chinese food safety scandal over melamine contaminated milk products are deeply worrying, because they touch upon trust between the Chinese authorities and the European Union and third countries, as well as upon external perceptions of the China-specific characteristics of the national economy. That developing countries have such problems is understandable… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

200TH POST

Just under one year ago, I began an unknown journey and became a blogger. This, to my astonishment, is my 200th post. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed myself. But have you enjoyed reading them? I would value all criticisms and suggestions.

Posted by Stanley Crossick

A cosy financial club?

Government legislates. Regulators apply the resultant regulation. Financial institutions are expected to comply with the regulations, with particular responsibility falling upon supervisory boards and non-executive directors. The blame game between them resolves nothing and any system has to recognise the greed and moral limitations of human nature. What needs further examination, however, is the relationship… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

In the wake of the financial meltdown, governments are taking steps to ensure its containment, ultimate recovery and how to prevent a recurrence. Individual countries have lost to globalisation their sovereignty to act alone. They can only recover it collectively by introducing an effective system of multilateral governance, certainly not by economic nationalism As Philip… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

Who Cares About EU Membership?

Who Cares About Europe? is the caption of the Charlemagne column in the last issue of The Economist. Whether voter indifference needs to be managed or feared is a pertinent question. Comparing it with national attitudes towards government is inappropriate. National politicians may have lost the trust of their electorates but the national system is… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

Ireland: a constitutional and political quagmire The findings of the Irish government research into the reasons for the rejection of the Lisbon Treaty were published on 10 September. The main reason people voted ‘No’ was a lack of knowledge or understanding of what they were voting on (42%). Taoiseach Brian Cowen will update the European… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

There have been, and will continue to be media articles, commentaries and analyses on the Beijing Olympics and their effect on China itself, and on its relationship with and future policies towards Europe, the United States and other major countries. It is still too soon to attempt any considered conclusions, but some general observations and… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick