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Return of history (2)

By remarkable coincidence, Kishore Mahbubani, with whom I have in the past exchanged views both in Singapore and by email, wrote in yesterday’s Financial Times, making the identical point that my post made: we are seeing played out in Georgia, “the return of history” – not its end and not the “triumph of western civilisation”.… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

Return of history

Francis Fukiyama was wrong. We have not been witnessing the end of history, but the return of history. One reason for this is that we have not learned the lessons of history. But who did not at least think that 1989 had brought to an end four decades of Cold War in Europe and the… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

Barack Obama goes home

Kuwait – Afghanistan – Iraq – Jordan – Israel – West Bank – Berlin – Paris – London, was the Barack Obama itinerary for the past week. The ‘celebrity tour’ element was a great success. However, the tour was part of his American electoral campaign, and the degree of its success will be seen in… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

Ahead of the Democrat Presidential candidate’s current foreign trip, Barack Obama laid out his ‘national security strategy’ in Washington on 15 July. His inspiration for the renewal of the global order is George Marshall. Needed then and needed again now is “a new overarching strategy to meet the challenges of a new and dangerous world.”… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

G8: an anachronism

Now that Hokkaido island has returns to normality, we should read the lengthy communiqués very carefully, as the Japanese bill for the summit is apparently €381m. Africa: The leaders re-committed themselves to the promises made three years ago at Gleneagles. Whether or not the agreed emission targets are sufficient, what is the mechanism to ensure… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

What is happening in Zimbabwe is horrific and unforgivable. The proposed sanctions resolution on Zimbabwe, rejected by the UN Security Council after vetoes by Russia and China on 11 July, is the latest example of a diplomatic and economic weapon that has a distinctly mixed history of success and failure. Whatever the true reasons for… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968, signed by 189 countries (but not India, Israel, Pakistan and North Korea) has been a dismal failure. Its objective is to limit the spread of nuclear weapons, but at the same time the nuclear powers agreed to reduce their stockpiles (which they have failed to do). Negotiations to stop… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

I commend to you this week’s first leader in The Economist, the beginning of which is reproduced below. “Global institutions are an outdated muddle; the rise of Asia makes their reform a priority for the West” CLUBS are all too often full of people prattling on about things they no longer know about. On July… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

Corruption requires at least two parties. There is constant criticism of corrupt Middle Eastern and African governments. However, six EU Member States have still not ratified the October 2003 UN Convention against Corruption, including two G8 members, Germany and Italy. Japan, another G8 member has also not ratified. Transparency International has just published a damning… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick

The Financial Time’s review of Robert Kagan’s new book, “The Return of History and the End of Dreams” prompts me to comment on the Kagan thesis. He is the author of the John McCain proposal to set up a “league of democracies” that would be led by the US but would reassuringly “complement” rather than… » read more

Posted by Stanley Crossick